Mentors and collaborators

The research drive to understand how dynamic social factors can either enhance or inhibit a person's ability to learn is shared, inspired and
supported by a number of key people.  

 
 
 
Alex

Alex

alex haslam

Alex has been at The University of Queensland since 2012 having previously held positions at the Australian National University and the University of Exeter. His research focuses on the study of group and identity processes in organisational, social, and clinical contexts. Together with colleagues, Alex has written and edited 11 books and published over 180 peer-reviewed articles on these topics. He has won several international teaching awards as well as the European Association of Social Psychology’s Lewin Medal.

 
Katie

Katie

Katharine Greenaway

Katharine completed her PhD in the School of Psychology at The University of Queensland in 2012 then joined UQ as a postdoctoral research fellow that year supported by a research fellowship from the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. Her research interests broadly centre on issues of human agency and control, emotion regulation, and identity processes. Her recent work focuses on the benefits of shared group membership and the surprising social costs of expressing positive emotion.

 
Cath

Cath

Catharine Haslam

Cath has worked in both clinical and academic fields for about 20 years. On completing her clinical degree, she worked in Rehabilitation and Aged Care Services in Canberra (1991-2001) during which she also completed a PhD in cognitive neuropsychology (1995-1998). In 2001 she moved to the UK where she worked at the University of Exeter and returned to Australia in 2012 to take up a post at The University of Queensland.

Cath’s research focuses on the cognitive and social consequences of trauma and disease in neurological populations. This work not only addresses questions about the integrity of cognitive ability, notably memory, and its rehabilitation, but also the impact that impairment of these abilities has on personal and social identity. More recently she has extended this work to investigate identity-cognition relationships in aging.